Posts Tagged ‘bugs’

Good Day, Sacramento!

This past Fri­day, I per­formed at the Sacra­men­to Com­e­dy Spot (in , uh, Sacra­men­to, CA).  To pro­mote the show, I made an ear­ly morn­ing appear­ance on a local TV show, “Good Day, Sacra­men­to.”

I said, “Good day!”

We talked about sci­ence and com­e­dy and insect pho­tog­ra­phy.  They even pulled up my pho­to blog:  InsectPaparazzi.com .

Link:  Sci­ence Come­di­an Bri­an Mal­ow on Good Day, Sacra­men­to

The Secret Life of Flies

If you know me, you know I like my insect pho­tog­ra­phy. I pri­mar­i­ly shoot (and release) live insects. But who amongst us hasn’t seen a dead bug pos­ing while repos­ing in death and felt the need to cap­ture that macabre Kodak moment?  If my eyes are the only eyes of the uni­verse to observe this detail, am I not oblig­at­ed to record it?

Any­way, that’s how I feel about it.  So, I’ve shot a few dead flies.

But this guy at Muhr Pho­tog­ra­phy takes it to a new lev­el, com­bin­ing real live dead flies with sim­ple line draw­ings. And I think they’re hilar­i­ous. I applaud the idea and the exe­cu­tion.  I’m jeal­ous!

After you start the slideshow – click the icon in the low­er left cor­ner to make it big­ger so you can see the titles  (in some cas­es, it helps you appre­ci­ate the image).  Or you can see this gallery and oth­ers here.

Giant Insect Ambassadors for the Rainforest

For our newest video for Time.com, I vis­it­ed an old friend, Norm Ger­shenz of SaveNature.org, to dis­cuss some of their pro­grams for rais­ing aware­ness and sav­ing pre­cious habi­tats that are home to strange and beau­ti­ful crea­tures like the giant thorny phas­mid.

Find out more about the Insect Dis­cov­ery Lab and how you can bring it to your Bay Area class­room.

New species of insect identified in eBay purchase

Dr. Richard Har­ring­ton, vice-president of the UK’s Roy­al Ento­mo­log­i­cal Soci­ety, bought a fos­silized insect on eBay and it turned out to be a pre­vi­ous­ly unknown species of aphid.

He bought the insect, which was encased in a 40-50 million-year-old piece of amber, for £20 (about $37).

“It’s a rather unusu­al route to come by (a new species),” Har­ring­ton explained.

I guess eBay hasn’t iden­ti­fied all the bugs in their sys­tem.

Read the full sto­ry on BBC News